Visit our Crayon Kiosk for Appy Learning!

While we don’t recommend screen time for babies or real little ones, preschoolers ages 2 and older may benefit from playing educational apps with a parent. Each DBRL branch now has a crayon kiosk with at least one iPad attached to it (and four iPads attached at the Columbia branch). These iPads each have the same app – an educational preschool app that will be switched out periodically. Each app is chosen for early literacy learning.

Child using iPad at crayon kioskThe current app is “Moo, Baa, La La La!” by Sandra Boynton. This digital story is narrated, and children can touch the animals to see them move and make sounds. My favorite is the dancing pigs, but many in the department prefer the snorting rhinoceros! Since these apps are for preschoolers, we encourage parents to play the apps with the children.

We also occasionally run a feature on DBRL Kids called “Get Appy.” Some of these apps are appropriate for older kids, too.

Feel free to check out the crayon kiosk with your child and explore the digital world in a safe way!

Welcome to Story Time!

Kids enjoying story timeHave you attended a story time at Columbia Public Library? If not, prepare yourself for a fun time - songs, rhymes, stories, big books, flannel boards, puppets and more are featured as the library staff educates and entertains in each thirty-minute program. Below is valuable story time info for both our regulars and new story time visitors. We have story times for different age groups, and we try to keep our story times on a fairly regular schedule (only occasionally interrupting for a special program such as a visiting performer or annual Summer Reading-themed programs or wrap-up). Continue reading

Ready Early, Read Rhymey

Humpty Dumpty clip artYou have probably already heard that it is never too early to start reading aloud to your child. Sometimes we field questions about what the age minimum is for summer reading, obtaining one of our library cards, etc. The answer? There really isn’t one. Birth, in utero, we aren’t picky. Literally, never too early. We mean it. That is because the sooner children are read to, then the easier their transition to reading independently will be.

“But, Random-Library-Lady-Writing-This-Blog-Post,” you’re thinking, “my brand new bouncing baby, while perfect in every way, won’t even be able to recognize a blurry version of MY FACE (you know, me, the one who gave them life?) until around three months; how can it possibly be helpful to read books to a newborn?” Continue reading

Heavy Medal: Mock Newbery Awards

Mock Newbery Award
The Newbery Medal is awarded each year to “the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” The Newbery Medal is to children’s literature what the Oscar is to the Academy Awards. In plain English: This award is given to the best chapter book of the year. Some popular Newbery award-winning titles include “The One and Only Ivan” by Katherine Applegate, “The Giver” by Lois Lowry and “The Graveyard Book” by Neil Gaiman.

About our Mock Newbery Program:

Throughout the fall, we are inviting youth in grades 4-8 to join us twice per month to discuss this year’s Newbery finalists. Library staff will facilitate the sessions along with Nancy Baumann, a local educator and previous Newbery committee member. This is the third year that the library has offered this unique book club opportunity and we hope that you will consider signing up.

How to get involved:

Sessions will be held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. at the Columbia Public Library on the following Wednesdays: Sept. 10, Oct. 1, 15, 29, Nov. 5, 19, Dec. 3, 17. Registration begins Tuesday, September 2. To sign-up, please call (573) 443-3161.

This year’s books:

Wondering what books we’ll be discussing this year? See the list below!

Patterns

Sorted crayonsPatterns are all around us and help children learn about the world around them. Patterns can be found in letters and numbers, shapes and sizes, daily routines, music and much more. By helping children see and learn patterns, you can help them with literacy, math, science and other skills. Try these fun activities to emphasize pattern building.

Sort! Help your child sort items in the house. Have different shapes and sizes of blocks? Sort them! Try everyday items like coins, stamps and playing cards. Which items are the same? Which items are different? Get them interested in food and nutrition by sorting food into colors or classifying them as fruits, vegetables, grains, etc. Check out library books featuring different kinds of animals – which ones are mammals, and which ones are reptiles? Have a child who likes to help around the house? Sorting laundry is just the thing for learning patterns and categorization.

Continue reading