Fall Into September Programs

Book cover for Bear Sees ColorsWarm weather is still hanging around, but we’ll all be admiring colored leaves and wearing our favorite hoodies before too long. We have lots of fun programs at our branches in September. See just a sample below, and be sure to check online for all our fall programs.

Sherry Norfolk

Sherry Norfolk’s storytelling is rhythmic and melodic,‭ ‬animated and exuberant,‭ ‬enlivened by an array of voices and sounds.‭ An award-winning performer, Sherry’s vivid stories engage audiences of all ages. This program is for ages 2 and up.

Ashland: Thursday, September 3 • 10-10:30 a.m.

Columbia: Wednesday, September 2 • 9:30-10 a.m. , 6-6:30 p.m.

Fulton: Tuesday, September 1 • 10-10:30 a.m. Continue reading

Our Super Summer!

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Your friendly Spider-man Librarian

Thanks to all our patrons for making this summer such a memorable one. “Every Hero Has a Story” has been one of our more popular Summer Reading themes, and kids, parents and employees showed their enthusiasm at all our branches.

Below are some favorite memories from this summer. What are your favorite moments?

2015-06-03 08.37.32Superhero Training AcademyHoly Bat Baby!Heroes triumphed over all obstacles. Continue reading

Tackling Tough Topics

Kids are curious. They ask a million questions. And as far as I know, there’s no definitive book of answers for how to talk to your little ones about serious issues, such as the Holocaust or slavery or hurricanes or death. It’s difficult to navigate how much to tell them when you want to be honest with them but not scare or overwhelm them with things they aren’t emotionally ready to handle. When you think you are ready to tackle these issues, there are some great books that can help.

Book cover for The Whispering TownThe Whispering Town” by Jennifer Elvgren is a beautifully written, simple book that tells the story of a family who hid Jewish families in Nazi-occupied Denmark and helped them get to Sweden safely. It is based on a true story and tells the clever and unusual plan that little Anett devises to get her “new friends” to safety. A sweet story, with just enough details for curious little ones. Continue reading

The Mark Twain Award

Mark Twain Award LogoEach year the Missouri Association of Library Services (MASL) compiles a list of a dozen books, books written by authors living in the United States and of high literary merit. These books are then read by thousands of children, grades four through six, across the state. These young readers then vote for their favorite title, and the winner is awarded the Mark Twain Reader Award.

Book cover for WonderMany of the nominees and winners have been from the realistic fiction genre, especially in the early years of the award. Titles like “How to Eat Fried Worms,” “Ramona the Brave,” and “The Pinballs” were all winners in the 1970s, depicting the lives of a variety of young people. The most recent winner of the award, “Wonder” by R. J. Palacio, continues in the vein of realistic fiction with the story of Auggie Pullman and his venture into middle school. Born with a facial deformity, Auggie goes to school outside his home for the first time, experiencing all the ups and downs that come with that. This non-traditional protagonist imparts wisdom and humanity to young readers, providing invaluable lessons of acceptance and love. Continue reading