About Johnathan

Children's Librarian by day, reads and plays with Legos by night. Dr. Seuss taught him to enjoy life and not get stuck in a waiting place, so one of his favorite children's books is "Oh, the Places You'll Go!"

Patterns

Sorted crayonsPatterns are all around us and help children learn about the world around them. Patterns can be found in letters and numbers, shapes and sizes, daily routines, music and much more. By helping children see and learn patterns, you can help them with literacy, math, science and other skills. Try these fun activities to emphasize pattern building.

Sort! Help your child sort items in the house. Have different shapes and sizes of blocks? Sort them! Try everyday items like coins, stamps and playing cards. Which items are the same? Which items are different? Get them interested in food and nutrition by sorting food into colors or classifying them as fruits, vegetables, grains, etc. Check out library books featuring different kinds of animals – which ones are mammals, and which ones are reptiles? Have a child who likes to help around the house? Sorting laundry is just the thing for learning patterns and categorization.

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Great Websites for Kids!

Kids using touch screen computerThe Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) maintains a helpful online resource that all parents should know about, “Great Websites for Kids.” Looking for some fun and educational sites to share with your children? Try some of the links below! And be sure to check out Great Websites for Kids” frequently - a different website is highlighted every week.

Creative Kids Central
Creative Kids Central encourages young people to explore the power and beauty of classical music. Co-sponsored by Classical KUSC 91.5 in Los Angeles and the Creative Kids Education Foundation, this site is primarily aimed at children aged 7-9, their families, and caregivers. Continue reading

Encourage Curiosity!

butterfly nonfiction booksWe often want to build on our children’s curiosity, but do you always have the right answer when they ask, “Why?” We can often discover the answers together in books shared between parent and child. Knowledge about the world, even in very young children, is key to understanding. Pairing a story and a factual book on nature or science helps expand children’s scientific knowledge. Read aloud “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle, and then explore a nonfiction book on butterflies. Since related activities can help reinforce learning, you may also want to perform a fingerplay of “Little Arabella Miller.” Here’s how.

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Books on Moving

Finding a new home when moving is hard, and finding books on moving can be just as challenging. As the new school year quickly approaches, we’ve gotten more requests for books to help children work through the challenges of moving. Fortunately, your friendly librarians have created a list just for you! Whether you’ve just moved here (welcome to our library!) or are moving somewhere else (you’ll be missed!), we have books to help your child with the moving process.  Having trouble picking? Below are a few favorites.

Book cover for Bella and Stella Come HomeBella and Stella Come HomeA little girl tries to reassure her favorite doll when they move to a new, and very different, home. But how do they trust a house that seems so empty and full of echoes?

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What Book Is Next in a Series?

One of the most frequent questions we librarians answer is what book is next in a series. And we love answering this question, as we enjoy chatting with patrons about what they’re reading. However, if you want some do-it-yourself tips on how you can easily find out what book is next in the series, whether you are searching our online catalog or browsing the Internet, read on!

In the Catalog

Have you ever heard of NoveList? You can find this term in our catalog. Say you are looking at “Fablehaven,” by Brandon Mull. You really liked the book and want to find the next in the series. Not all books have numbers on the side as easy identifiers. First, click on the first book (in this case, “Fablehaven”). Then, look for the NoveList link on the right side. Clicking that link will usually give you all the books in that series plus recommendations for similar titles.

Showing the NoveList link.

After clicking on a title, click the NoveList link to the right.

NoveList display

Once you click on NoveList, you’ll see series titles and similar recommendations.

 
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