About Johnathan

Children's Librarian by day, reads and plays with Legos by night. Dr. Seuss taught him to enjoy life and not get stuck in a waiting place, so one of his favorite children's books is "Oh, the Places You'll Go!"

Click to See Childhood Literacy and Technology Presentation

Girl using tablet

Chip Donohue, Ph.D., a nationally recognized expert on technology use in early childhood, recently visited Columbia to highlight some current research findings, best practices and big ideas on this topic. The informative slides from his presentation are now available for the public to view. Visit the Erikson TEC Center’s link for the presentation and then click below the description for slides and a link to the resources.

Pull Your Poetry Out of the Dark in the Callaway County Youth Poetry Contest

boy writingApril is National Poetry Month! In celebration, the Callaway County Public Library and the Auxvasse Creative Arts Program are inviting Callaway County kids and teens to submit an original poem. This year, kids and teens are challenged to write a poem that explores the night, shadows, sleep, your dreams or the dark.

Prizes will be awarded to winners in each age group, and a brief awards ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 28th, at the Callaway County Public Library in Fulton. Download full contest rules and an entry form here. Entries must be received by April 30, 2015.

Need some inspiration? Check out this book list of recommended poetry and verse for kids.

Summer Reading 2015 Bookmark Contest

Bookmark ArtHelp us get ready for Summer Reading by designing an original bookmark based on the theme “Every Hero Has a Story.” Winners’ artwork from each library will appear on bookmarks to be distributed late spring through summer.

Please design two-dimensional artwork, using crayons, markers or any other illustration tool or medium, or create it on the computer. Photography is also acceptable, as long as it is your own! For ages 18 and under. Download an entry form or get one at your library or on the bookmobile.

Entry deadline is Tuesday, March 31.

Let Your Imagination Loose With Dr. Seuss

What Pet Should I Get?Dr. Seuss (also known as Theodor Seuss Geisel or Theo LeSieg) was born on March 2. Not only is Dr. Seuss’ birthday celebrated on the 2nd, but the National Education Association celebrates Read Across America Day every year on or near that same date. (This year’s event is actually on March 2.) In case you are not familiar with the whimsical writings of Dr. Seuss, try “Green Eggs and Ham” or “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.” Kids love the playful rhymes and curious creatures of Seuss’ imagination.

And we have even more reason to be excited about Dr Seuss at the moment, as a new original Seuss book was just announced! Seuss’ widow found a new original manuscript while cleaning his office, and the book is to be published this summer. “What Pet Should I Get?” is about a near universal childhood theme – choosing a pet. The publisher estimates that the recently discovered manuscript was written between 1958 and 1962, as it features the same siblings we know from “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish.” And since so many Seuss books show his curious creations, we’re excited to see what creative pets he imagined. Read and re-read Seuss classics now, and join us in anticipating a new release in 2015!

Rhyme Time: Winter

Family time in snowWhile playing outside in the snow may be fun, some days it’s just too cold to go outside! Instead, warm yourself and your family by the fire and learn these winter rhymes for a fun interactive learning experience. Corresponding actions, if any, are in parentheses.

Five Little Snowmen
Five little snowmen all in a row
(Hold up five fingers.)
Each with a hat
(Pat the top of your head.)
And a big red bow.
(Pull at your neck as if you are fixing a bow tie.)
Out came the sun
(Make your arms form big circle over your head.)
And it stayed all day.
(Lean to the left.)
And one of those snowmen melted away!
(Make a melting motion with your arms and body.)
Repeat with four, three, two, and one. Continue reading