About Katie

When I was three I had my cousin convinced I could read. In reality I had heard "Joey the Jack-o-lantern" so many times I had it memorized. To this day everyone in my family can tell you when Joey is and is not scary.

Graphic Novels – Worthwhile Literature

For many, a graphic novel is just a long version of a comic book. While a number of graphic novels are larger collections of individual comic stories, a graphic novel in simple terms is a novel in comic-strip format. These graphic novels can be stand-alone stories, serialized, comprised of multiple issues, volumes in a series, etc. Graphic novels for young readers often include themes such as fitting in, growing up, friendship, dealing with loss, defeating monsters and saving the day (sometimes all in the same story!).

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Library Updates From Gigi the Giraffe

Gigi the GiraffeHey everyone! I can’t believe that it’s almost the end of the year. So much has happened at the Columbia Public Library these past twelve months! Are you enjoying the new carpet? Do you often say hi to Starry the Tiger, who is currently sitting on top of our “new books” section? Did you see the new dollhouse that’s on display until May? There are even iPads with educational apps for children 2 and over! The current app is “The Tale of Peter Rabbit.”

My outfits have changed a few times since my last post, too. Of late, the Owl and I have been watching everyone walk by in their wonderful hats and winter gear. I have to say, I was feeling slightly left out. My staff must have noticed, because now I’m up to my chin in winter wear! While all my winter clothes may not be as coordinated as what I have been wearing, I can assure you, I’m warm and toasty! And that snow that may or may not fall? I might enjoy a nice walk in the rain in the spring, but I’m staying out of that cold wet stuff! I would rather experience winter through a book or movie. Maybe I’ll wander over and pick out a movie or two to watch once my staff has left for the night. I hear there is one about two sisters and a snowman that has quite a few catchy songs…

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Seek and Find at the Library

magnifying glassDo you remember spending hours pouring over pages searching for Waldo? I do! Seek-and-find books are no longer just looking for a tall skinny guy in a striped shirt (although we check out plenty of those, too). We have books in which readers are asked to locate differences between two images or find small images inside full-size illustrations. We even have some seek-and-find books featuring pages with real photographs. The more books I looked for, the more I found (truly seek and find)!Find Momo the border collie.

One of the more charming titles I have come across is “Find Momo” by Andrew Knapp.  This book is full of photos, and each photo contains a border collie named Momo for readers to find. Sound easy? Not so much.  While you won’t have to go crazy looking up the answers online, you may find yourself needing a few minutes to actually find this adorable dog who enjoys playing peek-a-boo with readers. Another fun seek-and-find book is the Where’s the Meerkat series by Paul Moran. In these books you seek out a family of meerkats in a style similar to Where’s Waldo. However, in my opinion I find it easier to find a handful of meerkats (even if they are wearing sunglasses) in a crowd of humans than it ever was finding Waldo. Plus, the meerkats are just cute! Continue reading

Check It Out: Caramba

“Caramba looked like any other cat. He had soft fur and a long, stripy tail. He ate fish. He purred. He went for long walks. But Caramba was different from other cats. He couldn’t fly.”

Book cover for Caramba So begins the tale of Caramba, the cat who couldn’t fly. Caramba does want to fly, and he tries several times without success. In truth, Caramba is just different from all the other cats. Author Marie-Louis Gay has created an endearing character, with which we can all sympathize. We have all felt different at some point or been unable to do what seems easy to everyone else. Yet once Caramba accepts his differences and discovers his own personal talents, he is able to let go of his anxieties and even encourages his friend to try new things. If you have a little one worried about his or her own differences, check out this beautifully illustrated story.

Stories Without Words

Children love to tell tales, both of their own true experiences and those they have created. Often before a child can read print, you will see a child “reading” a book, ignoring the text, but using the illustrations as inspiration for a story he fashions as he turns the pages. In doing this, the child will learn to use illustrations as guides and will later be able to use this skill to help him in figuring out difficult words on a page and understanding more complex texts. Listening to a child “read” a book in this manner is a great way to build an early reader’s confidence and narrative skills. You can encourage your child to look closely at illustrations by providing her books without words. Try a few of our favorites:

Book cover for Chalk by Bill Thomson

Interested in more stories without words? Check out some of these.