Stacking, Sequencing and Narrative Skills

Can stacking cups really help with your child’s literacy? The answer is yes! Stacking is an early sequencing skill. When children successfully stack cups, they have also put them in a sequence. Sequencing is the process of putting events, ideas and objects in logical order, such as from large to small.This concept appears in stories like “Goldilocks and the Three Bears,” where Goldilocks progresses from large to small with a variety of objects. Once children understand that Goldilocks starts with the largest item, then tries the middle and ends with the smallest, they show their grasp of beginning, middle and end – a key component of narrative learning.

PAL Kit #8

PAL Kit #8

If you want to play with some stacking and sequencing toys from the library, check out our Play as Learning Kits. Kits number two (Encouraging Brain Development), and eight (Encouraging Creativity) have stacking toys. Kit five (Encouraging Family Reading) has a spindle puzzle, which also uses sequencing skills. You can ask about these kits at the Children’s desk at the Columbia Public Library. They are also listed in our catalog under “Play as Learning Kit” and are available to be placed on hold for delivery to any of our branches or bookmobile stops.

Summer Reading 2015

SR-emblem-colorGet ready for Summer Reading! You can stop by your library or bookmobile and sign up starting on Monday, June 1. The library’s Summer Reading program is a fun way to stay engaged in reading and learning over the summer.

This year’s theme is “Every Hero Has a Story!” Whether your hero is someone real you see every day or a fantastical superhero you imagine flying in the sky above, we celebrate the heroes both around us and inside us.

The Summer Reading program is free, and there are versions for all ages, from the youngest babies to kids, teens and even adults.  Find out more about Summer Reading!

Enjoy a Story Book Trail as Part of Bike, Walk and Wheel Week

bikeWe love seeing our patrons in the library enjoying their favorite books, but spring is also the perfect time to enjoy the outdoors with your family. May 3 through 9 is Bike, Walk and Wheel Week (BWWW). This year’s theme is the evolution of travel, highlighting our treasured MKT Trail (one of the nation’s original rails-to-trails) as a source of recreation, fitness and active transportation for our community. Columbia has lots of fun events planned for BWWW, but the library’s favorite has to be the Story Book Trail.

Columbia Parks and Rec chooses a book – often tying in the theme of BWWW – and displays the book’s pages on boards placed at a child’s height. The boards are then placed along a walking trail to encourage both walking and reading together. This year’s Story Book Trail is at the Hindman Discovery Garden in Stephens Lake Park. The story on display is Watty Piper’s classic, “The Little Engine That Could.” So if you get tired while walking, just remember, “I think I can, I think I can, I think I can.” The story boards will remain up the entire month of May. For more information about all activities during BWWW, please visit City of Columbia’s web page or check out this handy flyer.

Click to See Childhood Literacy and Technology Presentation

Girl using tablet

Chip Donohue, Ph.D., a nationally recognized expert on technology use in early childhood, recently visited Columbia to highlight some current research findings, best practices and big ideas on this topic. The informative slides from his presentation are now available for the public to view. Visit the Erikson TEC Center’s link for the presentation and then click below the description for slides and a link to the resources.

Buzz, Hiss, Moo, Rawr! Turning Sounds Into Words

Moo! by David LaRochelleWhat sound does a cow make? Moo! What sound does a chicken make? Bawk, bawk, bawk or cluck, cluck cluck! Many very young children are well aware that a tiger says “RAWR!” Spend a day in the life of a library worker at the Children’s Services desk in the Columbia Public Library and you will hear an ongoing stream of “RAWRs” from the mouths of little ones as they enter the area and spy “Starry the Tiger.” The words and phrases that imitate the sounds we hear are onomatopoeias. Continue reading