2014 Missouri Building Blocks: This Little Piggy

Book cover for This Little PiggyThis Little Piggy” by Tim Harrington

Tired of doing the same little piggies with your little one? Has going to the market or not having any roast beef become too routine? Well then, this great book is for you! Within these pages, you’ll follow a piggy that races go-karts! You’ll thrill to the adventures of Super Toe, who defeats a smelly sock with tickle power! And of course, don’t forget to follow the adventures of little piggy who built a spaceship. Continue reading

Missouri Building Blocks 2014: Moo!

Illustration from the picture book, Moo!It’s hard to express how much I love, love, LOVE “Moo!” by David LaRochelle! But I will try.

1. I love a good laugh, and reading “Moo!” will make your whole crew chuckle. If you have a 3-year-old, there might even be floor rolling involved. Who can ignore the hilarity of a cow who “borrows” a car?

2. I adore how LaRochelle brilliantly showcases the art of emotional expression. Believe it or not you can tell a whole adventure using only one word: Moo-Moo? Moo! I find the kiddos really get into this aspect of the book if you practice being sad cows, happy cows and excited cows before you launch into the more complicated moos explored in the book.

3. I dance with excitement when a book leads to more fun! “Moo!” naturally launches into creative and educational activities. Check out LaRochelle’s website for handy activity guides, puppet patterns and more. Your friendly state librarians have also gathered ideas on the MLA award page and Pinterest board. Personally, I’m dying to write “Baa!” – the sequel to “Moo!”

Still skeptical? Grab a copy and see for yourself. And remember to help your child vote for his or her favorite Missouri Building Block Picture Book after you’ve read at least five titles.

Give the Gift of Reading!

presentLooking for a gift for little ones? The gift of reading is beyond compare. And while you can check out all your child’s favorites at the library, we understand there may be some special titles you’d like to keep at home all the time. The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books produces an annual Guide Book to Gift Books every November. Find over 300 titles divided by age group with author, title, description, publisher and current price. Print out your pdf to take shopping, or download it to your smart phone and away you go!

Don’t Call It “Terrible Twos”

Toddler having tantrumHave you ever heard a parent say “I just want to skip past the “terrible twos”? While toddler-hood might be one of the most challenging ages (perhaps second only to the treacherous teen years), would anyone really want to skip a portion of their child’s life? I’d like to think not. Below are some ways to both better understand what toddlers are going through and also to help everyone in the family adapt to the changes that a toddler brings. And be sure to check out our many resources on toddler development at our library.

Routines and Repetition

While many adults crave variety, a toddler needs repeated activities both to help learn expectations and also to experiment. The repetitive pattern of “Old MacDonald Had a Farm,” for example, is popular because the child knows what to expect and can add different sounds/animals as the child’s knowledge develops. This is also why your child may want you to read the same story over and over again, night after night. Being able to predict what characters are going to do is a skill toddlers don’t immediately possess, so knowing what comes next is the fun part. Routines also help children learn what to expect. Toothbrushing and a story right before bedtime can teach children when bedtime is to be expected. Continue reading