Happy National Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day

waffleThe first Saturday in February may be my new favorite holiday — National Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day. The day was founded in the 1960s by a mom who wanted to give her kiddos something to look forward to during the cold, dreary, nasty days of winter. Legend has it (at least according to Wikipedia) that Florence Rappaport and her six children were hit with a massive blizzard which buried their town of Rochester, New York under several feet of snow. To brighten their day, Mrs. Rappaport decided to serve the children ice cream for breakfast, and so the tradition was born! As the children grew older, they traveled the world and kept up the yearly tradition of eating ice cream for breakfast. Continue reading

National Be Kind to Food Servers Month

Lunch Lady book coverJanuary is National Be Kind to Food Servers Month! To celebrate, you can read my new favorite series – Lunch Lady by Jarrett Krosoczka. The heroine is a mild-mannered cookie-serving lunch lady by day and a super secret agent by night. Cleverly disguised to blend into their cafeteria surroundings, Lunch Lady and her sidekick Betty use gadgets like the lunch tray laptop, taco-vision night goggles (you can see at night and everything looks like a taco) and hairnet-nets to keep the school safe from bullies and sinister cyborgs. Lunch Lady serves up laughs and justice while she fights off mutant mathletes, crazed authors and – worst of all – a league of evil librarians! She’s someone you want around if it’s lunchtime or crunch time!

Not all lunch ladies are super spies (maybe?) but they are all super heroes! Our cafeteria workers work hard to provide tasty, nutritious meals during the school year, so make sure you are kind to your food server. You just never know when they may have to save you from a horde of vicious bunnies!

Here are some ways you can be kind to your food servers:

New Year, New You!

New Year’s tends to bring a refreshing feeling and a thirst for change. What better way to start off the new year than by making a New Year’s resolution? The new year presents us with an opportunity to make a change; whether it’s to become healthier, lose a habit or do something just for fun! With limitless possibilities, it can be daunting to pick a resolution and stick with it. But the library is a great resource to find ideas and information to help kids get started on making a change for the better! Here are some ideas for New Year’s resolutions and some books to complement them:

1. Get a New Hobby

What better way to start the new year than by finding a new activity your child will love? Whether it’s collecting, crafting or playing, there’s always something new to try!

Book cover of "The Remarkable Farkle McBride"

 

The Remarkable Farkle McBrideby John Lithgow

Farkle McBride loves playing music, but he can’t figure out which instrument he loves the most. He tries just about every instrument imaginable – all before the age of 10!

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Teal Pumpkin Project

Last year I heard about a wonderful idea called the Teal Pumpkin Project. The primary goal of the project is to make trick-or-treating on Halloween safer for children with food allergies. To do this, Teal Pumpkin Project participants have non-candy treats on hand, and they display a sign and a pumpkin painted teal to let trick-or-treaters know safe treats are available. The Teal Pumpkin Project started in 2014, and it is the brain child of the Food Allergy Research & Education organization.  Logo for Teal Pumpkin Project

The Teal Pumpkin Project makes Halloween not only safer but healthier as well. If you hand out treats on Halloween, explore some non-candy options, such as pencils, erasers, glow sticks, stickers, bubbles, bookmarks, whistles or other small objects. Just be sure that you are aware of what might be a choking hazard for little ones. Don’t forget to display your participation with a Teal Pumpkin Project sign!

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Cooking With Kids

daughter making cookiesCooking with children is about more than food. It’s also about spending quality time together and making good memories. It can teach kids confidence and independence, and even some math.

I recommend starting with cookies. Two of my younger sisters still talk about how much they enjoyed making cookies with me when they were kids. (They are 8 and 10 years younger than me.) Two years ago my older son said, “Mom, I remember baking cookies with you every Christmas. Will you continue the tradition with my son?” His son was 6 months old at the time, but he was still able to press down on the cookie cutter to make cookies. Last year he was able to help stir the batter. This year, he’ll be able to do even more. When I asked my younger son if he remembers baking cookies as a child he said, “Sure. I think that was the beginning of my enjoyment of cooking.” He now cooks for himself and loves to invite friends to his home for meals. The older son also cooks and often has dinner ready when his wife comes home after picking up the children at daycare. Continue reading