Take a Color Walk!

Two people walkingThis is an exciting time for young ones to be outside, observing how Mid-Missouri shifts from winter to spring. Plants are changing from little green sprouts to blooming flowers or trees within a few days’ time. Would you like to enhance your time spent outside? Try a color walk.

A color walk is very simple. As you walk around outside, look for different colors. You can use a log to keep track of the colors you have seen and where you saw them.  I’ve created a sample log you can view and print by clicking on this link. The log can be filled in with simple marks to show you have seen that color, or it can be more detailed with a word or picture describing where that color was seen. You can also create your own log, which is a great way to get your child involved and excited about their color walk adventure. If your walk is in a safe (and mud-free) area, you can also add texture to your walk by asking your child to look for textures such as smooth, bumpy, rough or soft. All of these tasks will help your child develop their vocabulary and sharpen their observation skills.

For more resources about colors, search our collection for books and kits on the topic!

SOAR Survey

Do you have children ages 0-6? If so, would you be willing to fill out a survey for SOAR (System Offering Actions for Resilience)? The survey is completely voluntary, and the questions ask about the information you receive about parenting, including how, where, and what kinds.There are also some questions about challenges you may face as a parent and any additional support and resources you may need as a parent. The findings from the survey will help SOAR to examine the community needs pertaining to early childhood awareness and parenting needs in our community.

To participate in the survey, click here.

Fidget Boxes

Photograph of a fidget boxDoes your child need a little extra help focusing during story times or other children’s programs? We’ve got you covered! We’re proud to be introducing the Fidget Box–now available at all three branches and on Bookmobile, Jr. What is a fidget you ask? A fidget is a small tool (disguised as a toy) that kids can hold, squeeze and, well, fidget with, all the while helping them concentrate. Fiddling with a fidget is a great and quiet way to channel energy that might otherwise disrupt others. Our fidget boxes contain toys, I mean tools, to tantalize the senses, including a small weighted lap blanket, a Koosh ball, Tangles and more!

What about fidgeting when you aren’t at the library? Try Silly Putty, Play-Doh or stress balls. You can also try making your own fidgets. Cut up a pool noodle to make a stress ball. Wrap a pipe cleaner around a pencil or take out the middle man and wrap it around your finger, as seen here. And don’t worry grownups, you can fidget too–keep one of these by your desk and just see how productive you can be. Happy fidgeting!

Celebrate National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month! Since April also ushers in warm, wonderful weather, I’m going to highlight some poetry that focuses on nature in its many forms. Whether it is the fascinating change of seasons, the curious lives of animals or the endless possibilities of adventure, Mother Nature never fails to spark fascination, creativity and prose. Poetry is also a great learning tool. Word play, alliteration and rhyming are techniques that help children learn literacy skills at a young age.

Here are some children’s poetry books that celebrate the world around us.

"The book of Nature Poetry" book cover

 

National Geographic Book of Nature Poetry” (J808.8193 NAT)

This lengthy book is filled to the brim with world play and professional level nature photography we have come to expect from National Geographic.

 

Continue reading

Free Electronic Books

child-1183465_960_720Do you know that DBRL subscribes to several online book services for children, such as Tumblebooks and StarWalk Kids Media? All you need is your library card number and a tablet or computer, and you can get started reading these interactive digital books.

We also like to share outside resources that catch our eye. Two of the most recent resources we’ve found useful are Storyline Online by the SAG-AFTRA Foundation and the Billion e-Book Gift by Reading is Fundamental and Ustyme.

Storyline Online includes activity guides and titles that are written by well-known authors such as Kevin Henkes, Patricia Polacco and Audrey Penn. The stories are read by well-known actors, and they add about 4 new titles per year. With the Billion e-book Gift you have access to 50 classic e-books, including titles like “The Little Red Hen”, “The Gingerbread Man” and “Colors and Emotions.” There are no fees or advertising. The website says this project will be available through December 31 of this year.

Have fun exploring these tools with children ages 3 and up.