Happy National Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day

waffleThe first Saturday in February may be my new favorite holiday — National Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day. The day was founded in the 1960s by a mom who wanted to give her kiddos something to look forward to during the cold, dreary, nasty days of winter. Legend has it (at least according to Wikipedia) that Florence Rappaport and her six children were hit with a massive blizzard which buried their town of Rochester, New York under several feet of snow. To brighten their day, Mrs. Rappaport decided to serve the children ice cream for breakfast, and so the tradition was born! As the children grew older, they traveled the world and kept up the yearly tradition of eating ice cream for breakfast. Continue reading

Paper and Digital Stories with Kamishibai

KamishibaiPlease join us and experience the wonderful world of Kamishibai! Kamishibai is a unique form of Japanese storytelling in which the storyteller stands to the right of a special stage and uses illustrated cards as the visual. It was developed in the 1920s by street vendors who would present the shows to attract crowds and sell candy. The early precursors of Kamishibai can be traced back to the 9th or 10th century!

Columbia Public Library will be presenting Paper and Digital Stories with Kamishibai on February 4th from 6-7 pm in the Studio. During this session, we will present a story using our very own Kamishibai theater! After the story, we will create our own Kamishibai cards to take home.

Ages 7-12. Please register by calling 573-443-3161.

Photo credit: Kamishibai via Flickr (license)

Kindness is Contagious

In honor of Valentine’s Day (February 14) and Random Acts of Kindness Week (February 14-20), we thought it would be fun to create a list of some love and kindness themed books that the library offers for young readers. It is never too early to teach and share the value of love and kindness.

One of my favorite things to do each year is create Valentine’s Day cards with friends and hand them out at local nursing homes and hospitals. Just a simple way to spread joy. (This is double the fun if you have kids who can deliver cards with you.) Below are some of my top pick books to encourage kindness in young readers. Click on the book title to check library availability. Happy reading!

Start Early Books:

Book cover for How Kind by Mary Murphy

“How Kind!” by Mary Murphy
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National Be Kind to Food Servers Month

Lunch Lady book coverJanuary is National Be Kind to Food Servers Month! To celebrate, you can read my new favorite series – Lunch Lady by Jarrett Krosoczka. The heroine is a mild-mannered cookie-serving lunch lady by day and a super secret agent by night. Cleverly disguised to blend into their cafeteria surroundings, Lunch Lady and her sidekick Betty use gadgets like the lunch tray laptop, taco-vision night goggles (you can see at night and everything looks like a taco) and hairnet-nets to keep the school safe from bullies and sinister cyborgs. Lunch Lady serves up laughs and justice while she fights off mutant mathletes, crazed authors and – worst of all – a league of evil librarians! She’s someone you want around if it’s lunchtime or crunch time!

Not all lunch ladies are super spies (maybe?) but they are all super heroes! Our cafeteria workers work hard to provide tasty, nutritious meals during the school year, so make sure you are kind to your food server. You just never know when they may have to save you from a horde of vicious bunnies!

Here are some ways you can be kind to your food servers:

2016 Youth Media Award Winners

Each year the American Library Association honors books, videos, and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media. The following titles and contributers are some of the 2016 YMA winners.

Caldecott Winner

Finding Winnie book coverFinding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear,” illustrated by Sophie Blackall and written by Lindsay Mattick.

A woman tells her young son the true story of how his great-great-grandfather, Captain Harry Colebourn, rescued and learned to love a bear cub in 1914 as he was on his way to take care of soldiers’ horses during World War I, and the bear became the inspiration for A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh. Continue reading