Make Your Own T-Shirt Cape!

t-shirt capeIf you love this year’s summer reading theme of superheroes, you’ll love this activity – make your own super hero cape from an old t-shirt. It only takes a few minutes, and sewing is optional. All you will need is a t-shirt, a pair of sharp scissors, a few inches of Velcro and either a hot glue gun, fabric glue or needle and thread. Just follow the directions below.

  1. Lay the t-shirt out on a large flat surface. (I used my kitchen table.)
  2. Cut up the sides of the shirt, along the seams, all the way to the top. When you get to the sleeves, just keep following the seam all the way around, so the sleeves are removed. (You can keep the sleeves for another superhero project.*)
  3. Remove the front of the shirt by cutting just in front the top seams and along the bottom of the neck hole, but keeping the neck hole intact. If the cape is too long for your hero, trim some material off the bottom. Hemming is not required with this kind of fabric.
  4. Cut open the neck hole, right in the middle.
  5. Attach the Velcro to either side of the neck hole (about an inch on each side) with your fabric glue, hot glue gun or needle and thread. This prevents the cape from becoming a choking hazard.
  6. Enjoy your awesome cape!

I found the instructions online, and the link to the full instructions can be found by clicking here.

*Remember when I said to keep the sleeves? Included in the full instructions are steps on how to make power cuffs from the sleeves of our t-shirt.

2015 Callaway County Youth Poetry Contest Winners

Congratulations to the winners of the 2015 Callaway County Youth Poetry Contest, sponsored by the Callaway County Public Library and the Auxvasse Creative Arts Program! The theme for this year was to pull poetry “Out of the Dark.”

Callaway Winners5-8 years old
1st: Elise Klein
2nd: Dakota Harmon
3rd: Anna Klein

9-12 years old
1st: Megann M. Tenney
2nd: Kaylynn Buxton
3rd: Sophia Ruthanne English

13-18 years old
1st: Heidi Royer
2nd: Aris Lamont
3rd (tie): Amariah Ferguson
3rd (tie): Jordyn Mackey

The contest was judged by Clarence Wolfshohl and Denise Felt. For more information, please visit the Auxvasse Creative Arts Program. You can also read the winning entries on the library’s website!

2015 Summer Reading Bookmark Contest Winners

Owl superhero bookmark

Designed by Abby Law

A group of very talented kids and teens created bookmarks to promote our upcoming Summer Reading program. The theme for all ages this year is “Every Hero Has a Story.” See the 2015 winners, and be sure to pick up a bookmark when you visit the library!

Summer Reading 2015

SR-emblem-colorGet ready for Summer Reading! You can stop by your library or bookmobile and sign up starting on Monday, June 1. The library’s Summer Reading program is a fun way to stay engaged in reading and learning over the summer.

This year’s theme is “Every Hero Has a Story!” Whether your hero is someone real you see every day or a fantastical superhero you imagine flying in the sky above, we celebrate the heroes both around us and inside us.

The Summer Reading program is free, and there are versions for all ages, from the youngest babies to kids, teens and even adults.  Find out more about Summer Reading!

Novels in Verse Are a Novel Idea

Book cover for The CrossoverAs I’m sure many of us know by now, April is National Poetry Month! However, if you (or your children) are anything like me, you hear “poetry” and immediately think of vague metaphors you think you understand but aren’t quite sure. I have flashbacks to English literature courses, having to explain the significance of poems and having no idea what Keats, Dickinson or Frost actually meant. Well, I have discovered the best way to cure my poetry anxiety! Novels in verse are absolutely wonderful. They are separate poems that come together to tell one cohesive story. Even if you do not quite understand one of the poems, the rest are there to fill in the gaps so you know the whole story.

Novels in verse are perfect for middle grade readers (and adults who love reading children’s literature like myself!). This is the age where poetry starts getting introduced in schools, and for some it can seem scary and hard. These novels can make verse seem less alien and provide a love of poetry in young readers, encouraging them to read and write their own. I, personally, have found that reading multiple novels in verse has helped me not be so afraid of reading poetry and find that I can understand what the author is talking about and get drawn into the story, just like with a regular novel. Continue reading