Beat the Heat

Photo of children playing in waterWow! The summer heat is already in full swing, and August is promising to be even hotter! One way that I like to beat the heat is to face it head on by going outside and splashing around. You can do this too by going to the beach or the pool to catch some waves, or you can even turn to your own yard! Here are some ideas that will help you cool off at home.

  • Freeze toys in ice cubes — Place small toys like plastic cars or bugs into your ice cube tray. Fill the tray with water, and freeze it overnight. Take the ice cubes outside, and see who can melt theirs the quickest.
  • Ice cube painting — Fill an ice cube try with food coloring and water. (This is a great time to talk about color mixing.) Put plastic wrap over the tray and add craft sticks or toothpicks to each cube. (This is optional, but it will make a great handle for painting.) When the cubes are solid, use them to paint on paper or fabric.
  • Target practice — Draw a target on the sidewalk with chalk. Wet down a few sponges, and toss them into the target!

What would summer fun be without a soundtrack? Personally, I stay cool by listening to the Beach Boys, which you can find on Hoopla or on CD at your local branch. Or you can get really creative and make your own summertime playlist on Freegal.
Remember to wear sunscreen and drink lots of water!

Breaking the Rules at the Library!

Kids making paper airplanes When you think “libraries,” you never really associate them with breaking the rules. But on Friday the 24th, after the Columbia DBRL branch was closed, library patrons were
throwing airplanes from the highest reaches of the library and star-gazing all night long (well, actually,
only until about 10 p.m.). Party with Stuck paper airplanethe Stars Plus Paper Airplanes was the name of this event, and a great time was had by children and adults alike.

After the library locked its doors at 6 p.m., patrons began shuffling through the back doors to get started folding their paper airplanes and helicopters. Children and parents watched in amazement as their paper creations soared, hovered and weaved their way down the three stories of the library.

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Summer Reading Book Lists

Summer Reading LogoDid you know that we’ve compiled book lists specifically about our Summer Reading theme, “On Your Mark, Get Set, Read”? These home run reads are all about movement, sports and games. We have print copies of the book lists at our library branches, but you can also access them online!

 

Party With Planets and Paper Airplanes!

Night sky with paper airplanesDo you like stargazing? Do you enjoy making paper airplanes? Or perhaps you’re like me and you like throwing things from high places? If you said yes to any of these things, you’ll want to check out our upcoming program, “Party With the Stars Plus Paper Airplanes.”

 

This program will take place at the Columbia Public Library on Friday, June 24 from 7-9 p.m. We’ll start this after-hours party indoors by making paper airplanes to soar off of the library balcony. Then at 8 p.m., we’ll move outside where we hope clear skies will allow us to see Jupiter, Mars and Saturn through a telescope. At this time of year, Mars is closer to the Earth, so it will be one of the “stars” of the night. If the weather is cloudy, we’ll stay inside for a presentation about these planets and tips on how to see them yourself. This program is hosted by Val Germann and co-sponsored by the Central Missouri Astronomical Association. Enter through the Gene Martin Secret Garden at the west end of the main parking lot. Ages 6-adult.

 

Want to read up on astronomy before you attend the program? Check out these materials.

2016 Design a Bookmark Contest Winners

In March we challenged youth ages 18 and under to design a bookmark based on the theme, “Ready, Set, Read!” to promote our Summer Reading program. The contest winners have officially been announced, and the winning bookmarks have been printed and will distributed all summer long. Be sure to pick up a bookmark when you visit the Columbia Public Library.

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